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Germany’s Contribution to Climate Change

October 14, 2012

ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt

This graph shows the average carbon dioxide concentration over time. The graph shows that there is a trend of small increases and decreases of concentration throughout the years but the overall trend of the line is shifting up, increasing.

http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/tre_coun.html

This graph shows the carbon dioxide emissions of several different countries throughout time. The graph shows us that China is the main Carbon Dioxide contributor, and Kenya emits the least amount of carbon dioxide. Germany’s emissions are have slightly been decreasing throughout the past 30 years.

Like many other places around the world, Germany emits carbon dioxide from solids, liquids, gases, flaring, and cement. Germany’s biggest attribute to carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere are from solids, which i find to be somewhat unusual because most think gases are what cause majority of the co2 in our atmosphere.

Germany had a big spike in the amount of carbon dioxide emissions it was putting into the atmosphere around the year 1965. One reason for the big increase in emission could be because of nuclear power plants being shut down. After Fukushima, Germany shut down almost half of their nuclear power plants, which were replaced with burning fossil fuels.

The per capita co2 emissions for Germany is about 2.5. This is 51% of the United States co2 emissions per capita. Germany’s value is much lower than the united states, almost half, because Germany emits much less co2 then the united states. Germany uses more natural energy sources like solar, and wind power.

Compared to the other countries, Germany is ranked 38th in the per capita of co2 emissions. This is really good compared to the United States that comes in at 12th. 38th is still really high in the ranking out of 215 listed. This is a good indication that Germany needs to start thinking about how to cut back on CO2 emissions. Although they are not as bad as the United States, there are still majority of countries that have a lower per capita emissions of co2.

The total fossil fuel emissions from Germany seem low based on the graph above. Compared to the other countries on the graph, Germany is much lower than both the United States and China. Although Germany is higher than Kenya, Italy, and India, It is not much higher and follows their lines more than the United States and China.

In 2008, the most recent set on data in the graph, China was the highest emitter of CO2 out of the countries on the graph. Per Capita, China’s emissions are about 1.43, where as the United States is almost 5. This means that the United States people are more at fault for CO2 emissions than people in China.

The cumulative contribution to climate changed based on the amount of carbon dioxide emitted since 1900 is the highest for the United States at 91229888 metric tons.

China’s cumulative carbons dioxide contribution is only 34% of the United States cumulative contribution. India’s cumulative contribution is only 10% of the United States. The shows that the United States in the most at fault for the amount of CO2 emissions into our atmosphere. The United States since 1900 has output over double that of China, with a much smaller population.

Looking at the global emissions of carbon, i see a similar trend to that on the global emissions of Carbon dioxide. The carbon emissions is also increasing steadily over time. The emissions on carbon dioxide is the amount, in metric tons, of co2 released into the atmosphere during a certain time period. A concentration is the amount of Co2 in present in the atmosphere.

“Germany Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions.” Germany Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/tre_ger.html&gt;.

“Nuclear Down, CO2 up in Japan, Germany.” SmartPlanet. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/intelligent-energy/nuclear-down-co2-up-in-japan-germany/13924&gt;.

http://www.inemar.eu/xwiki/bin/view/InemarDatiWeb/Difference+between+concentration+and+emissions

http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/top2008.cap

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4 Comments
  1. I found this a little hard to read and follow. Grammatical errors, and you did not use any units in your emission rates. You stated that “The per capita co2 emissions for Germany is about 2.5.” that’s great, but 2.5 what? tons? Tonnes? You did a great job at explaining the graphs and what they represent. Lots of information in the paragraphs, and the entire post shows that you did your research on Germany.

  2. Like Canada said, there were some errors and some numbers could have been clarified, also the graph does not have which country is which line listed. However, The information you gave us about Germany was very in depth and well researched so that was very good.

  3. i agree with the comments above, just do more editing others than that the page looks good maybe add another theme to your blog.

  4. The first image used is great. I like how it shows what they are doing to mitigate emissions. It is nice for visual people like me.

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